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Dale

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Reply with quote  #1 
Here goes a dive into stuff far over my head: Not being a quantum mechanic should have warned me off, but reasons from the real world give me pause to the three-flavor solution to the late neutrino shortage crisis.

Unless I am mistaken, stellar fusion is commonly taken to be entirely made up of what I call "dynamic stellar fusion". The specification of "dynamic" pertains to the process of stellar plasma heated to such a temperature that speeding protons collide with each other to result in the strong force overcoming electrostatic repulsion in order to bond,  hydrogen for instance into helium ions/atoms. It is understood that we are obliged to expect such a process to include the mutual annihilation of one positron with one electron for every such stroke of nuclear fusion of hydrogen ions. It follows that our scholars assure us that each such annihilation event presents the generation of an anti-neutrino. 

Prompted perhaps from estimates of how much stellar fusion is occurring versus how many  anti-neutrinos are in evidence, a cerebral crisis had endured over an alleged shortage of neutrinos. Heroic efforts of the elite subsequently came to the rescue with findings that neutrinos undergo transformations between detectable flavors and undetectable flavors of neutrinos as they travel along.

As a result, those findings leave me high and dry with my contrary account for why we should never have expected so very many anti-neutrinos. That unmarketable accounting resides in the believe that a static form of stellar fusion should be suspected within the central core of a star. Under the presumption of a downward-pointing electrical field in a typical shining star, then an abundant quantity of protons would occupy such central cores to the exclusion of electrons. A stable formation of concentric arrays of charged particles can be better understood if one were to observe a large hollow sphere holding a golf ball at its center by means of loops tethering the inner ball within its host by elastic tension. Static pressure would force protons together in an equilibrium with heat induced seperation of those particles. No electrons would be available at such a site to produce any anti-neutrinos.

If my explanation were found to be true, it would explain a copious oversupply of electrons in our galaxy, and that should present the foundations for downward-pointing electrical fields for our galaxies and stars.






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DrCharbonneau

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Are you saying there is a deficiency of actual solar neutrinos?
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The universe is a hairball. It was created by Fritz the Cat. :P Einstein said the universe was like a plate of spaghetti. Still, you don't want to know what transpired between him and Elsa to bring about that idea.
Dale

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCharbonneau
Are you saying there is a deficiency of actual solar neutrinos?


An alleged shortage has been presumed. The presumption is called the Solar Neutrino Problem.    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/Astro/solneu.html#c1"  that I have been thinking to have been an inadvertent overestimation of dynamic solar fusion (among plasma). My own presumption that some solar fusion (that within the solar central core) would not proceed in the presence of electrons made me suspect that a consequential illusion of neutrino shortage would distress our scientists until they too came to appreciate the simple and direct results of a downward electrical field.

The Solar Neutrino Problem seemed to me to have had a Solar Neutrino Solution designed to specification. My solution was different because I was ignorant of some of the general consensus misinformation.






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DrCharbonneau

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Reply with quote  #4 
Actually, Dale, I am aware of the problem. I just wanted to see if you are a non-believer in morphose neutrinos. I'm undecided about which camp I want to join.

I do know that for some reason I'm not being notified of some posts. I'll have to look at that.

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The universe is a hairball. It was created by Fritz the Cat. :P Einstein said the universe was like a plate of spaghetti. Still, you don't want to know what transpired between him and Elsa to bring about that idea.
Dale

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Reply with quote  #5 
Am just as doubtful as can be. Neither can I swallow cosmic acceleration.
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DrCharbonneau

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Reply with quote  #6 
I would hope not. There's one heck of a lot of cosmic out there to swallow, accelerated or otherwise...

I should ask, though, why the problem with "cosmic acceleration?" I'm wondering if this is another up and coming great debate. Of course I'm just another guy with a theory, but I think an infinite universe will cause acceleration of the least significant particles, then reverse that as they curve back upon their origin.


FYI... I'll be paying the rent shortly, so we're good for a few more months. I've been busier than snot writing my novel. I'm writing Chapter Nine right now and just had this poor time traveling dude fight off a family of giant brown recluses. At least the guy gets laid in the next few paragraphs...

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The universe is a hairball. It was created by Fritz the Cat. :P Einstein said the universe was like a plate of spaghetti. Still, you don't want to know what transpired between him and Elsa to bring about that idea.
Dale

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Reply with quote  #7 
My problem with the seemingly unanimous acceptance of cosmic acceleration as it has been presented: We are to presume that gravity is dying off. 

A single stellar type is deemed to accelerate outward. Maybe it is simply exchanging position with other matter. It should be of negative charge and could be prone to exchanging of position with positively charged material that is either unseen or merely lacking of the characteristics that would present its deceleration. That would make cosmic acceleration nothing but an illusion.

If the universe is contained of nothing significantly different from what we  find within our galaxy, the virtual production of extra electrons I fancy to occur within every shining star could account for actual acceleration. Mutual repulsion might thus serve to explain actual acceleration. However, If there is dark matter and it it were of positive electrical charge, then it would be folly for us to be so sure that the entire universe accelerates away. They peek through a keyhole and presume to survey an entire room.

Furthermore, it does not seem that the our physicists are playing with a full deck if indeed they cannot understand the stable formation of concentric macroscopic arrays of charged particles. There seems to be a consistent application of stigma toward people who even mention such electrical impact upon galactic infrastructure. There seems to be others who have realized such electrical structure before me but they have perhaps all disgraced themselves as jackasses nevertheless. That does not prove me to be a jackass. 

Perhaps a scientist must fear to lose his employment if he were to stray too far from consensual dogma. 







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DrCharbonneau

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Quote:
 There seems to be a consistent application of stigma toward people who even mention such electrical impact upon galactic infrastructure.


Freedom is enigmatic, thus considered stigmatic. Freedom of thought. Freedom to act in a rational manner. Freedom to say "No!" On and on. The stimatic solution is to provide plenty of free-dumb.

The universe is like a playground. Some like the monkeybars where others like the swing.


We are too far away from a galctic core to ever witness a change that might be caused by some phenomenon. Maybe if we lived to be 20,000 we could see some events that happened 18,000 years ago. If we had a probe that could view the future or the past we could learn some truth.

Any truly good scientist is self employed.

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The universe is a hairball. It was created by Fritz the Cat. :P Einstein said the universe was like a plate of spaghetti. Still, you don't want to know what transpired between him and Elsa to bring about that idea.
Dale

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrCharbonneau
 
Any truly good scientist is self employed.


The mere fact that big government employs a huge proportion of scientists empowers big government with excessive influence upon the training of scientists. Nothing in science is cut-and-dried but what civil servant would shop for anything else? Got a new theory? "Best Mind" on the subject goes thumbs up or down and that is it. Reporting a cause-and-effect as all turned around? "Best Mind" passes down his verdict. How ya gonna pry out any dirty dogma?







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DrCharbonneau

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Reply with quote  #10 
Is the dirty dogma worth prying out?

Eventually I will reach some successful level in my research. I already know this. Once I have enough imppetus to demonstrate it undeniably, "Best Mind" will suddenly claim it as its child.

I just keep marking time and logging events. I put some here and there. Eventually once my paternity is usurped, I'll have a metaphorical birth certificate. One such certificate resides in my novel. Similar to the Jules Verne example.

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The universe is a hairball. It was created by Fritz the Cat. :P Einstein said the universe was like a plate of spaghetti. Still, you don't want to know what transpired between him and Elsa to bring about that idea.
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Reply with quote  #11 
Hope you get there. Just hit the ninth anniversary of my breakthrough to my kernel of truth. Have also thought of burying it into a fictional story. My eight decades are slowing me down and brings worries how long it has to take.

The electrostatic electron gun proves my point, but there is probably a fudged-in alternative to seeing it as so.

Good luck with your whatever or whatever it is: any hints?
Dale

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Reply with quote  #12 
Dam if I did not post a reply without logging in. That was me as an unregistered kibitzer.
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DrCharbonneau

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Reply with quote  #13 
Damn if I didn't misspell impetus.


Hints as to what I'm up to are all over jootbox. I keep few secrets unless I think the information is sensitive, as in someone could build on and do harm with it.

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The universe is a hairball. It was created by Fritz the Cat. :P Einstein said the universe was like a plate of spaghetti. Still, you don't want to know what transpired between him and Elsa to bring about that idea.
DrCharbonneau

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Afterthought: I intend to sell my copies of my novel as a trilogy of hand bound, hardcover books. I actually had the pleasure of working in a print shop in Elkhart, IN some years back and learned how books are bound by machine. What people really want, in the hand bound book case, are the covers. What I'm driving at is, yes, write a novel. If you can't do the binding I can, then we can sell them online with a buy button or for a bit less on Ebay. 

I enjoy helping friends find a niche.


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The universe is a hairball. It was created by Fritz the Cat. :P Einstein said the universe was like a plate of spaghetti. Still, you don't want to know what transpired between him and Elsa to bring about that idea.
Dale

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Reply with quote  #15 
Meanwhile, back at the ranch, that guy Yuri Milner might find a way to discover one or more of us. Wouldn't that be the cat's pajamas? It would be just a little too immodest to nominate ourselves.
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